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Review of "THE ZERO THEOREM"
By Jayne Waterford
Copyrighted © Jayne Waterford, 2014 Revised 2nd January 2015
REVIEW: "THE ZERO THEOREM" by Jayne Waterford

Terry Gilliam's "THE ZERO THEROEM" (2014) is just a lot of men being very silly.

Under the pressure of genius Qohem (Christoph Waltz) has cracked and is now put to work manipulating vector graphics in an attempt to prove that everything (100%) is for naught (=0). These graphics have fragments of equations written on them, like hieroglyphics but will not remain crunched. That is until Bob (Lucas Hedges) arrives. Bob is the rebellious son of Management (Matt Damon) who sent his only son. One day all will be his. However, he doesn't want it. As a gifted brat and an actor committed to his role (Lucas Hedges) he emancipates Qohem from a lackluster life and ultimately emancipates him from the control of management as well. Tilda Swinton's Dr Shrink-Rom was a reprieve.

I loved the colours of the world and overwhelming nature of mass media outside, but it's often hurried. For example, the production values of the sound bites, starring Lily Cole and others is shit. The virtual tropical location is very cool, until the sun ultimately goes down and we're are we? Alone?

If it had been brought out 20 years ago, it would have

been cutting edge, however, the majority of us are conversant with data and where it lives so the physical manifestations of ultimate data storage and it's magical tentacles squish our suspended disbelief all out of shape. Some low tech magic works. For example, Management (Matt Damon)'s arm dressed in the same fabric as his chair moves and in our stomachs we realise that it's alive :) Perhaps they could have done more to sustain the illusion that Management was present at the party of untenably well dressed in the home of the office administrator Joby, played by a fast talking David Thewlis as a hologram rather then having him turn up physically in front of fabric that was rushed in its hanging in a very real world light (Thinking The President (Donald Sutherland) sitting at a desk in Katniss (Jennifer Lawrence)'s drawing room, Francis Lawrence's "THE HUNGER GAMES: CATCHING FIRE" (2013)). I'm really sorry guys but you've committed to a flop.

We loved Bainsley (Mélanie Thierry) but were puzzled by her PG excuse for not getting it on. "THE ZERO THEOREM" was very PG Terry and we got the feel that we weren't supposed to notice stuff. The ill though through references to the irrelevance of religion. The try too hard it's just a space of Qohem's interiors. The fabric. The pressure people were under to convey theatre. 3/10
Copyrighted ©: Jayne Waterford, 2014.

Terry Gilliam's
"THE ZERO THEOREM" (2013)
Director Terry Gilliam
Producers Nicolas Chartier, Dean Zanuck
Stars Christoph Waltz (Qohen Leth), Mélanie Thierry (Bainsley), David Thewlis (Joby), Lucas Hedges (Bob), Matt Damon (Management), Ben Whishaw (Doctor 3), Tilda Swinton (Dr. Shrink-Rom)
Release Date 15th May 2014
Category Fantasy Sci-Fi
Running Time 107 minutes (1 hour, 47 minutes)
Rating M
Origin UK
Awards ARTnews Movies Best Fashion Appropriation in Costuming 2014
http://zerotheorem.co.uk/
Distributor SONY PICTURES
Official Blurb "An eccentric and reclusive computer genius plagued with existential angst works on a mysterious project aimed at discovering the purpose of existence – or the lack thereof – once and for all. However it is only once he experiences the power of love and desire that he is able to understand his very reason for being." - SONY PICTURES PR
CAPTIONS: Lucas Hedges as Bob, from Voltage Pictures' The Zero Theorem.
PHOTO BY: Hugo Stenson
CAPTIONS: Christoph Waltz as Qohen Leth from Voltage Pictures' The Zero Theorem.
PHOTO BY: Hugo Stenson
CAPTIONS: Melanie Thierry as Bainsley from Voltage Pictures' The Zero Theorem.
PHOTO BY: Hugo Stenson
CAPTIONS: Christoph Waltz as Qohen Leth & Lucas Hedges as Bob, from Voltage Pictures' The Zero Theorem.
PHOTO BY: Hugo Stenson