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Review of "THE HOBBIT: AN UNEXPECTED JOURNEY"

Revised from original published material:
Copyrighted © Jayne Waterford, 13th May 2013.

EXTENDED REVIEW: "THE HOBBIT: AN UNEXPECTED JOURNEY" 10/10 by Jayne Waterford

Peter Jackson, with the ever present help of partner, writer and imaginaire Fran Walsh, has delivered a wonderful experience in "THE HOBBIT: AN UNEXPECTED JOURNEY" ("THE HOBBIT") (2012).

I was delighted at the pace of "THE HOBBIT". This is a wonderfully told story. The camera didn't hang on emotion like it hovered over the fretting face of Frodo for hours in Jackson's "THE LORD OF THE RINGS: THE RETURN OF THE KING" (2003). It progressed.

Martin Freeman brings some back bone to the character of Bilbo. He's not, "nice." He is someone who is not afraid to speak his mind to the backs of dwarves.

I particularly enjoyed both the riddle game with Gollum and the arrival of the dwarves at Bilbo's home. Even though I knew precisely how many were coming and in what order, after meeting Dwalin at the door I knew things were more serious than rolly-polly cutie-pies who shreek and do star jumps when surprised. These were not little men who sent someone else to do their dirty work, even if they were willing to pay handsomely for it.

Peter Jackson's
"THE HOBBIT: AN UNEXPECTED JOURNEY" (2012)
Release Date 26th December 2012
Category Historical Documentary
Running Time 169 minutes (2 hours, 49 minutes)
Rating M
Origin Aotearoa
Awards Dan Hennah (Production Design); Ra Vincent and Simon Bright (Set Decoration)
Director Peter Jackson
Stars Ian McKellen (Gandalf), Martin Freeman (Bilbo), Richard Armitage (Thorin), Ken Stott (Balin), Graham McTavish (Dwalin), William Kircher (Bifur / Tom Troll), James Nesbitt (Bofur), Stephen Hunter (Bombur), Dean O'Gorman (Fili), Aidan Turner (Kili), John Callen (Oin), Peter Hambleton (Gloin / William Troll), Jed Brophy (Nori), Mark Hadlow (Dori / Bert Troll), Adam Brown (Ori), Ian Holm (Old Bilbo), Elijah Wood (Frodo), Hugo Weaving (Elrond), Cate Blanchett (Galadriel), Christopher Lee (Saruman), Andy Serkis (Gollum), Sylvester McCoy (Radagast), Barry Humphries (Great Goblin) and Jeffrey Thomas (Thror)
http://thehobbit.com
Distributor Warner Bros. Pictures
Dwalin (Graham McTavish) was a battle-hardened man who hadn't eaten for three days. The dwarves are characters of great gravity. Thorin was shown on battle fields akin to those of Isildur and given stature. These are battles of such weight that lines like, "take back what is ours," take on a gravity they miss in the book. In my childhood it read only as gold. "There is one I could follow, there is one I could call king," recounts Balin.

Thorin is shown in a charcoal and spent battle field, after a plot propelling defeat. But we first meet him in a lounge room a little embarrassed that he got lost along the way, and subtly teasing Bilbo about his door. Even though, he is treated with great deference by his subjects, his fellow dwarves. Even Gandalf goes quiet when he arrives. Perhaps I have a hitherto unexplored thing for dwarves or warriors at least. The dwarves set about cleaning out Bilbo's larder, as if it will need to be empty by the end of the evening. Every warrior can do something silly that implies great skill and the dwarves are no exception if Bilbo's chip-free crockery is anything to go by.

When Bilbo got up the next day and the house was so ordinary, the day ahead as predictable as trout and pumpkin for dinner, we all set out on a real journey.

The world of Jackson's Middle Earth is inhabited by ancient characters of fully realised peoples.

The dwarves are accompanied by a courtly music that skips in a cautious way. They are civilised people in armour going out to win back their world. I'd love to see how they dress when they are at home.

May Gibbs' Blue Moutains gets a look in when Tolkien refers to the Blue Mountains as the home where in the dwarves lead a contented life. But like Tolkien took her final chapter, an outline for, "The Lord of the Rings," trilogy, the dwarves read the portents, left their contented, smaller life-style and journeied to The Lonely Mountain to reclaim their long forgotten home. Like the plot, they left a life of peace and enough in the Blue Mountains to reclaim their homeland, the Arkenstone and all the gold therein.

Jackson made a few interesting decisions along the way:

Gandalf was blonde. And when in a panic Gandalf says Torin! like Germans pronounce Neanderthal, portraying something of his origins.

All creatures are eloquent. The trolls: Bert, Bill and

Copyright: (C) 2012 WARNER BROS. ENTERTAINMENT INC. AND METRO-GOLDWYN-MAYER PICTURES INC.
Photo Credit: Mark Pokorny
Caption: (Clockwise from bottom left) GRAHAM McTAVISH as Dwalin, ADAM BROWN as Ori, KEN STOTT as Balin, JAMES NESBITT as Bofur, MARK HADLOW as Dori and JED BROPHY as Nori in New Line Cinema's and MGM's fantasy adventure "THE HOBBIT: AN UNEXPECTED JOURNEY", a Warner Bros. Pictures release.
Copyright: No Data
Photo Credit: James Fisher
Caption: (L-R) GRAHAM McTAVISH as Dwalin, KEN STOTT as Balin and MARTIN FREEMAN as Bilbo Baggins in New Line Cinema's and MGM's fantasy adventure "THE HOBBIT: AN UNEXPECTED JOURNEY", a Warner Bros. Pictures release.
Tom are not the dumb ass thugs of the book. This sometimes works to the detriment of the story. For example, Barry Humphries voice performance as the Great Goblin was so sanguine it reduced what should have a been a thrilling escape through the goblin caves to clever. Goblins heads were pushed off. Masses were out manoeuvred. No one was cleaved. This is the mistake Fran Rubel Kuzui made in "BUFFY THE VAMPIRE SLAYER" (1992). Kuzui made it safe rather than frightening. And it's what the television series (1997) got right. The series was frightening and consequently extremely successful. But this is how the goblin cave is in the book. It's silly. Perhaps Christopher Tolkien's tolerance for fright wasn't sky high when he was hearing these tales age five. And that's what Barry Humphries gives us. Silly. Safe. Calm. He's on the brink of going for debonair.

Jackson’s elves aren't Vulcans. We might think Elves are equanimous like Spok because of their height, the shape of their ears and expressionless demeanour. However, when the Arkenstone is discovered Thror, the dwarf king, is already going barking mad. He has an art deco, diamond-encrusted beard for fuck's sake. He was already king of a vastly wealthy people. So it was only one step more to decree he was divinely appointed. A divine right to rule wasn't even decreed by the English

kings until King James I. But when Thranduil (Lee Pace), an ultimate king of the Western elves sees the Arkenstone, he's so jealous that when the dwarves are at their greatest need Thranduil denies their people help.

And then there is the matter of signs and omens. They seem to be commonly accepted in Middle Earth. For example, Thranduil respects Thror's demand to pay homage on the strength of the sign of the Arkenstone in the same way that signs prompt the dwarves to return to the mountain. A sign propels our entire adventure.

The production team did not stint on size. Unlike the crew who scaled down the car sized decedents of Rowling's elephantine Aragog, much to the detriment of Columbus' "HARRY POTTER AND THE CHAMBER OF SECRETS" (2002), the wargs are huge and the orcs often enormous and potentially very frightening.

The lines have been changed. The story is different. I noticed that it's particularly when Tolkien takes a conspiratorial tone with his little readers that the story veers into battles that weren't prefigured. The 15 birds in five fir trees is a good case in point, even if the end result is more exhilarating than eagles plucking people

to safety. Bilbo becomes more of a man than he was in the book. The encounter with Bill, Bert and Tom is another. The battle against the trolls was choreographed in Verbinsky "PIRATES OF THE CARIBBEAN: THE BLACK PEARL" mayhem.

And some killer details were added: Dwalin and Balin regard each other with deep affection before they reaffirm their bond with a decent head-butt. "That's my mother's glory box can you please not do that," as Kili scraps his boots on its edge. It's the spirit of his mother Belladona Took that moves Bilbo to join the adventure and run out the door without his handkerchef.

Radagast the Brown is an awesome invention. And his Rastabell rabbits are tough. In the hands of Sylvester McCoy Radagast turned out to be such a resilient character he could have his own franchise. Look out for "RADAGAST: BROWN BUSINESS" & "RADAGAST 2: LORD OF THE FLIES" and then "RADAGAST THE BROWN: THE PREQUEL". It's Radagast that sees the necromancer's presence in the wood takes the form of giant spiders and innocent, dead animals. Radagast is alone but moves urgently in a state of crisis. He is a busy man with his own agenda. He can bring creatures back from the dead by magic when they are killed by witchcraft. He goes someway to reclaiming the word

witchcraft from Rowling. On a lighter note he is very good at going cross-eyed adding an element of buffoonery, and sometimes deep concentration to his shenanigans in the forest.

Nuiances like the Freudian fear of return to the mother's womb are missing.

Well I guess you could say the hobbit hole is one elongated vagina. Or perhaps the dwarves drift in one by one after a very long trek only to navigate a fallopian tube. (Hate the way female sexuality is often limited to the physiology of internal organs that can't be touched. It's not like men wax lyrical about their vas deferns.) But after many other adventures and probably in part III, the dwarves pop a key into the keyhole, storming the door between the two legs of the mountain and fearfully, stealthfully and with trepidation move down the tunnel, for at the bottom of their journey lies the dragon and their horde of gold. Or we can hope this survives the transposition to film. To date it's all interesting rocks, established trees and gravity.

Not much reference is made to "THE LORD OF THE RINGS" ("LOTR"). Elrond makes a veiled reference to Aragorn and the Rangers when he tells Gandalf, "You are not the only guardian to stand watch over middle

earth." Even the musical themes are used sparingly, but they are used. From my reading between the lines, even though the team felt regret that Guilmero del Toro left the project as director, it seems that not one aspect of his development survived.

Consequently our company get to trek through the same countryside to the same journey music as the company of nine led by Boromir and Aragorn. And Thorin gets to borrow the greatness of Isildur.

Use of colour is interesting. It's used like a musical palette where they finally hit the tonic in moments of relief. To warm us up and relax our experience colours are warmed up like a sunset as the companions stand in meetings in safe havens or on the shoulders of their achievement, ready for part II. These colours signal a time for respite, time to feel relief.

Colour is also created with lighting to indicate time frames, particularly during flash backs. It's a simple language and easy to follow.

There were a couple of disappointments. It seemed to me that the character of Azog the chef white orc, Thorin's nemesis lost something in CGI. Azog the

defiler, with skin like deeply cut play-dough, was dead inside. There was nothing behind his eyes.

The wargs themselves came across like not too frightening skin covered frames, reminiscent of the wolves in Joe Carnahan's "THE GREY" (2011). It makes you wonder if decisions that evoke your disbelief are made so it's less scarey. It was a mistake and detracted from the possible greatness of the film.

I mean the creature Azog is the descendant of an elf whose descendants were distorted by torture. Perhaps Lawrence Makoare who played both the Witchking and Gothmog in Jackson's "THE LORD OF THE RINGS: THE RETURN OF THE KING" (2003) was asking for too much money. He is one of those rare people who project great presence beyond a layer of rubber which is what was needed in the character of Azog. And his face gets heaps of screen time.

I have always been a little disconcerted at the hatred between elves and orcs, expressed in murderous and absolute terms. Haven't we moved beyond the Second World War? O brother, my brother and elf could say to an orc. But Tolkien doesn't. He hates the orc with the passion of someone who stayed behind or didn't fight in the Great Wars and has his elves do the same.

The Message: Yes there is a message and that is: the value of mercy and small things.

Gandalf presents Bilbo with an elvish blade he really doesn't want and extolls him with the words, "True courage is about knowing not when to take a life but when to spare one." (It was pity that stayed Blibo's hand and saved him in the end.)

To Galadriel Gandalf explains "Saruman believes that it is only great power that can hold people in check. I found it is the small things. Everyday deeds of ordinary folk keeps the darkness at bay. Small acts of kindness and love."

"THE HOBBIT" is something happening in our homes, a familiar place. It's a warm, real, entertaining story. It also blows our childhood minds:

Who could have imagined:

  • Thror, a protected elder and his bejewelled beard.
  • The depth of the kingdom within the Lonely Mountain.
  • the pounding of the hot ingot held confidently above the head of the smith.
  • Stone giants hurling rocks in the storm are the
  • mountain sides themselves.
  • a Smaug who wakes from his slumber, snorting from one nostril from under his pile of golden horde, even though he seems to look like anyone's dragon except for the crocodile-like pudgy iris.

    Complete languages are a treat. It harkens back to Tolkien's skill at merging the characteristics of famous language groups to produce writings that are aesthetic and convincing. They are so well-spoken I want to go off and learn Orc and Elvish, something like people were compelled to learn Clingon decades ago.

    There's probably an eye-brows unit.

    Bilbo's affection for the hyper-intelligent ponies is very fetching.

    Fili (Dean O'Gorman) has gone on to a Hollywood experience as Cruise's tall companion in Joseph Kosinski's "OBLIVION" (2013). I'm sure Mark Hadlow (a very civilised and polite person, Dori) and Aidan (Kili, the other cute one and leading member of the Weta Workshop Dancers) will continue to attend more fights. (Thanks for the beers Mark. If Peter and Fran are looking for another elf please tell them that my ass is

  • no longer triangular. I was eating a lot of red meat back then. ;)

    Peter Jackson's "THE HOBBIT: AN UNEXPECTED JOURNEY" (2012) is a complete world and it begins with Bilbo and Frodo's life at Bag End, a complete life. Old Bilbo (Ian Holms) and Frodo (Elijah Wood) play their time at home with such deep comfort, felt from their shoulder blades to the tips of their hobbit toes, I'm willing to assert that the completeness of their life would be conveyed even if there had been no "LOTR".

    "THE HOBBIT" is a satisfying film, in every detail. It's awesome! Collect it!

    Copyrighted ©: Jayne Waterford, 16th May 2013

    See more...


    Peter Jackson's
    "THE HOBBIT: AN UNEXPECTED JOURNEY" (2012)
    Release Date 26th December 2012
    Category Historical Documentary
    Running Time 169 minutes (2 hours, 49 minutes)
    Rating M
    Origin Aotearoa
    Awards Dan Hennah (Production Design); Ra Vincent and Simon Bright (Set Decoration)
    Director Peter Jackson
    Stars Ian McKellen (Gandalf), Martin Freeman (Bilbo), Richard Armitage (Thorin), Ken Stott (Balin), Graham McTavish (Dwalin), William Kircher (Bifur / Tom Troll), James Nesbitt (Bofur), Stephen Hunter (Bombur), Dean O'Gorman (Fili), Aidan Turner (Kili), John Callen (Oin), Peter Hambleton (Gloin / William Troll), Jed Brophy (Nori), Mark Hadlow (Dori / Bert Troll), Adam Brown (Ori), Ian Holm (Old Bilbo), Elijah Wood (Frodo), Hugo Weaving (Elrond), Cate Blanchett (Galadriel), Christopher Lee (Saruman), Andy Serkis (Gollum), Sylvester McCoy (Radagast), Barry Humphries (Great Goblin) and Jeffrey Thomas (Thror)
    http://thehobbit.com
    Distributor Warner Bros. Pictures

    Copyright: (C) 2012 WARNER BROS. ENTERTAINMENT INC. AND METRO-GOLDWYN-MAYER PICTURES INC.
    Photo Credit: No Data
    Caption: No Data
    Copyright: (C) 2012 WARNER BROS. ENTERTAINMENT INC. AND METRO-GOLDWYN-MAYER PICTURES INC.
    Photo Credit: Courtesy of Warner Bros. Pictures
    Caption: Gollum voiced by ANDY SERKIS in New Line Cinema's and MGM's fantasy adventure "THE HOBBIT: AN UNEXPECTED JOURNEY", a Warner Bros. Pictures release.
    Official Blurb 30th July 2012 Peter Jackson's Long-Awaited Filmed Adaptation of "THE HOBBIT" to be a Trilogy

    Peter Jackson will make a third film in his upcoming adaptation of J.R.R. Tolkien's enduringly popular masterpiece 'The Hobbit: there and back again a Hobbit's holiday', it was jointly announced today by Toby Emmerich, President and Chief Operating Officer, New Line Cinema, Gary Barber and Roger Birnbaum, Co-Chairman and Chief Executive Officers, Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios, and Jeff Robinov, President, Warner Bros. Pictures Group. Jackson, the Academy Award®-winning filmmaker behind the blockbuster "THE LORD OF THE RINGS" Trilogy, recently wrapped principal photography on what he originally planned to be a two-film adaptation of Tolkiens's, 'The Hobbit: there and back again a Hobbit's holiday', which is set in Middle-earth 60 years before 'The Lord of the Rings'.

    Jackson stated, "Upon recently viewing a cut of the first film, and a chunk of the second, Fran Walsh, Philippa Boyens and I were very pleased with the way the story was coming together. We recognized that the richness of the story of the Hobbit, as well

    as some of the related material in the appendices of The Lord of the Rings, gave rise to a simple question: do we tell more of the tale? And the answer from our perspective as filmmakers and fans was an unreserved ‘yes.' We know the strength of our cast and of the characters they have brought to life. We know creatively how compelling and engaging the story can be and—lastly, and most importantly—we know how much of the tale of Bilbo Baggins, the Dwarves of Erebor, the rise of the Necromancer, and the Battle of Dol Guldur would remain untold if we did not fully realize this complex and wonderful adventure. I'm delighted that New Line, MGM and Warner Bros. are equally enthusiastic about bringing fans this expansive tale across three films."

    Emmerich stated, "We completely support Peter and his vision for bringing this grand adventure to the screen over the course of three films. Peter, Fran and Philippa's reverence for the material and understanding of these characters ensure an exciting and expanded journey that is bound to please fans around the world."

    "With the abundance of rich material, we fully endorse the decision to further develop what Peter,

    Fran and Philippa have already begun. We are confident that, with the great care the filmmakers have taken to faithfully bring this journey to the screen, the film will be welcomed by the legions of fans across the globe," said Barber and Birnbaum.

    Robinov added, "Peter, Fran and Philippa have lived in this world and understand more than anyone its tremendous breadth and scope, and the relationships that bind it together. We strongly support their vision to bring this great work fully to life."

    The first film in the trilogy, "The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey," will be released December 14, 2012, with the second film releasing on December 13, 2013, and the third film slated for summer 2014. All three films will be released in 3D and 2D in select theatres and IMAX.

    From Academy Award®-winning filmmaker Peter Jackson comes three films based on The Hobbit by J.R.R. Tolkien. The trilogy of films are set in Middle-earth 60 years before "The Lord of the Rings," which Jackson and his filmmaking team brought to the big screen in the blockbuster trilogy that culminated with the Oscar®-winning "THE

    LORD OF THE RINGS: THE RETURN OF THE KING".

    Ian McKellen returns as Gandalf the Grey, the character he played in "THE LORD OF THE RINGS" Trilogy, with Martin Freeman in the central role of Bilbo Baggins, and Richard Armitage as Thorin Oakenshield. Returning cast members from "THE LORD OF THE RINGS" Trilogy also include Cate Blanchett, Orlando Bloom, Ian Holm, Christopher Lee, Hugo Weaving, Elijah Wood, and Andy Serkis as "Gollum." The international ensemble cast also includes (in alphabetical order) John Bell, Jed Brophy, Adam Brown, John Callen, Billy Connolly, Luke Evans, Stephen Fry, Ryan Gage, Mark Hadlow, Peter Hambleton, Barry Humphries, Stephen Hunter, William Kircher, Evangeline Lilly, Sylvester McCoy, Bret McKenzie, Graham McTavish, Mike Mizrahi, James Nesbitt, Dean O'Gorman, Lee Pace, Mikael Persbrandt, Conan Stevens, Ken Stott, Jeffrey Thomas, and Aidan Turner.

    The screenplay for "THE HOBBIT: AN UNEXPECTED JOURNEY" is by Fran Walsh & Philippa Boyens & Peter Jackson & Guillermo del Toro. Jackson is also producing the film, together with Carolynne Cunningham, Zane Weiner and

    Fran Walsh. The executive producers are Alan Horn, Toby Emmerich, Ken Kamins and Carolyn Blackwood, with Boyens and Eileen Moran serving as co-producers.

    Under Jackson's direction, all three movies are being shot in digital 3D using the latest camera and stereo technology. Additional filming, as with principal photography, is taking place at Stone Street Studios, Wellington, and on location around New Zealand.

    "THE HOBBIT: AN UNEXPECTED JOURNEY" and its successive installments are productions of New Line Cinema and MGM, with New Line managing production. Warner Bros. Pictures is handling worldwide theatrical distribution, with select international territories as well as all international television licensing, being handled by MGM.

    Press release: 30th July 2012 ###
    Official Blurb 25th July 2012
    "From Academy Award®-winning filmmaker Peter Jackson comes "THE HOBBIT: AN UNEXPECTED JOURNEY", the first of two films adapting the enduringly popular masterpiece The Hobbit, by J.R.R. Tolkien.  The second film will be “The Hobbit: There and Back Again.” 

    Both films are set in Middle-earth 60 years before Peter Jackson's "THE LORD OF THE RINGS" (2001-2003), which Jackson and his filmmaking team brought to the big screen in the blockbuster trilogy that culminated with the Oscar®-winning Peter Jackson's "THE LORD OF THE RINGS: THE RETURN OF THE KING" (2003).

    The adventure follows the journey of title character Bilbo Baggins, who is swept into an epic quest to reclaim the lost Dwarf Kingdom of Erebor from the fearsome dragon Smaug.  Approached out of the blue by the wizard Gandalf the Grey, Bilbo finds himself joining a company of thirteen dwarves led by the legendary warrior, Thorin Oakenshield.  Their journey will take them into the Wild; through treacherous lands swarming with Goblins and Orcs, deadly Wargs and Giant Spiders, Shapeshifters and Sorcerers.

    Although their goal lies to the East and the wastelands of the Lonely Mountain first they must escape the goblin tunnels, where Bilbo meets the creature that will change his life forever… Gollum. 

    Here, alone with Gollum, on the shores of an underground lake, the unassuming Bilbo Baggins not only discovers depths of guile and courage that surprise even him, he also gains possession of Gollum’s “precious” ring that holds unexpected and useful qualities … A simple, gold ring that is tied to the fate of all Middle-earth in ways Bilbo cannot begin to know.

    Ian McKellen returns as Gandalf the Grey and Martin Freeman in the central role of Bilbo Baggins.  Also reprising their roles from Peter Jackson's "THE LORD OF THE RINGS" (2001-2003) movies are: Cate Blanchett as Galadriel; Ian Holm as the elder Bilbo; Christopher Lee as Saruman; Hugo Weaving as Elrond; Elijah Wood as Frodo; Orlando Bloom as Legolas; and Andy Serkis as Gollum.  The ensemble cast also includes (in alphabetical order) Richard Armitage, John Bell, Jed Brophy, Adam Brown, John Callen, Billy Connolly, Luke Evans, Stephen Fry, Ryan Gage, Mark Hadlow, Peter Hambleton, Barry Humphries, Stephen Hunter, William Kircher,
    Evangeline Lilly, Sylvester McCoy, Bret McKenzie, Graham McTavish, Mike Mizrahi, James Nesbitt, Dean O’Gorman, Lee Pace, Mikael Persbrandt, Conan Stevens, Ken Stott, Jeffrey Thomas, and Aidan Turner.

    The screenplay for "THE HOBBIT: AN UNEXPECTED JOURNEY" is by Fran Walsh & Philippa Boyens & Peter Jackson & Guillermo del Toro.  Jackson is also producing the film, together with Carolynne Cunningham, Zane Weiner and Fran Walsh.  The executive producers are Alan Horn, Toby Emmerich, Ken Kamins and Carolyn Blackwood, with Boyens and Eileen Moran serving as co-producers. 

    Under Jackson’s direction, both movies are being shot consecutively in digital 3D using the latest camera and stereo technology.  Filming is taking place at Stone Street Studios, Wellington, and on location around New Zealand.

    Among the creative behind-the-scenes team returning to Jackson’s crew are director of photography Andrew Lesnie, production designer Dan Hennah, conceptual designers Alan Lee and John Howe, composer Howard Shore and make-up and hair designer Peter King.  The costumes are designed by Ann Maskrey and Richard Taylor.  The

    score is being composed by Howard Shore.

    Taylor is also overseeing the design and production of weaponry, armour and prosthetics which are once again being made by the award winning Weta Workshop.  Weta Digital take on the visual effects for both films, led by the film’s visual effects supervisor, Joe Letteri.   Post production will take place at Park Road Post Production in Wellington.

    Both are productions of New Line Cinema and MGM, with New Line managing production." - Warner Bros. Pictures PR

    Press release: 25th July 2012
    See more...

    Copyright: (C) 2012 WARNER BROS. ENTERTAINMENT INC. AND METRO-GOLDWYN-MAYER PICTURES INC.
    Photo Credit: Courtesy of Warner Bros. Pictures
    Caption: CATE BLANCHETT as Galadriel in New Line Cinema's and MGM's fantasy adventure "THE HOBBIT: AN UNEXPECTED JOURNEY", a Warner Bros. Pictures release.
    Copyright: (C) 2012 WARNER BROS. ENTERTAINMENT INC. AND METRO-GOLDWYN-MAYER PICTURES INC.
    Photo Credit: James Fisher
    Caption: IAN McKELLEN as Gandalf in New Line Cinema's and MGM's fantasy adventure "THE HOBBIT: AN UNEXPECTED JOURNEY", a Warner Bros. Pictures release.
    Copyright: (C) 2012 WARNER BROS. ENTERTAINMENT INC. AND METRO-GOLDWYN-MAYER PICTURES INC.
    Photo Credit: Mark Pokorny
    Caption: (Clockwise from bottom left) GRAHAM McTAVISH as Dwalin, ADAM BROWN as Ori, KEN STOTT as Balin, JAMES NESBITT as Bofur, MARK HADLOW as Dori and JED BROPHY as Nori in New Line Cinema's and MGM's fantasy adventure "THE HOBBIT: AN UNEXPECTED JOURNEY", a Warner Bros. Pictures release.
    Copyright: No Data
    Photo Credit: James Fisher
    Caption: (L-R) GRAHAM McTAVISH as Dwalin, KEN STOTT as Balin and MARTIN FREEMAN as Bilbo Baggins in New Line Cinema's and MGM's fantasy adventure "THE HOBBIT: AN UNEXPECTED JOURNEY", a Warner Bros. Pictures release.
    Copyright: (C) 2012 WARNER BROS. ENTERTAINMENT INC. AND METRO-GOLDWYN-MAYER PICTURES INC.
    Photo Credit: James Fisher
    Caption: (L-R) HUGO WEAVING as Elrond, RICHARD ARMITAGE as Thorin Oakenshield, MARTIN FREEMAN as Bilbo Baggins and IAN McKELLEN as Gandalf in New Line Cinema's and MGM's fantasy adventure "THE HOBBIT: AN UNEXPECTED JOURNEY", a Warner Bros. Pictures release.
    Copyright: (C) 2012 WARNER BROS. ENTERTAINMENT INC. AND METRO-GOLDWYN-MAYER PICTURES INC.
    Photo Credit: Mark Pokorny
    Caption: MARTIN FREEMAN as Bilbo Baggins in New Line Cinema's and MGM's fantasy adventure "THE HOBBIT: AN UNEXPECTED JOURNEY", a Warner Bros. Pictures release.